TECH WEEKLY

July 5, 2019

1. Waymo robotaxis getting closer to commercial use in California
2. Jony Ive leaving Apple after nearly 30 years
3. A glimpse to the future – Big changes coming in sports cars

 

 

Waymo robotaxis getting closer to commercial use in California



A week after Waymo made 10 of its autonomous vehicles available to Lyft users in Phoenix, Alphabet’s self-driving car company can now begin transporting passengers in its robotaxis, thanks to a new regulatory approval in California. The California Public Utilities Commission issued approval for Waymo to join a pilot program called Autonomous Vehicle Passenger Service Pilot. Waymo follows Zoox, Autox Technologies, and Pony.ai to participate in the pilot program.

In December 2016, Waymo spun out of Google, and since December 2018 it has been testing its commercial robotaxi service called Waymo One, in Phoenix, with a limited group of customers.

The limited service area in the California pilot program includes the neighborhoods of Mountain View, Sunnyvale, Los Altos, Los Altos Hills, and Palo Alto, and will be restricted to giving rides to Waymo employees and their guests only.

In 2018, Waymo became the first, and to date the only, company to operate fully driverless cars without human drivers behind the steering wheel on public roads in California.


Source: TheVerge



Jony Ive leaving Apple after nearly 30 years

Jony Ive, the chief architect of innovative and unique designs from the iMac to the iPhone, announced on Thursday that after nearly 30 years he is leaving Apple.

Ive, who has led Apple’s design team since 1996, is leaving “to form an independent design company which will count Apple among its primary clients.” The company is called LoveFrom, and Ive will be joined by famed designer Marc Newson.

“While I will not be an employee, I will still be very involved – I hope for many, many years to come,” Ive said in an interview with the Financial Times. “This just seems like a natural and gentle time to make this change.”

“Jony is a singular figure in the design world and his role in Apple’s revival cannot be overstated,” chief executive Tim Cook said in a statement. “Apple will continue to benefit from Jony’s talents by working directly with him on exclusive projects, and through the ongoing work of the brilliant and passionate design team he has built. After so many years working closely together, I’m happy that our relationship continues to evolve and I look forward to working with Jony long into the future.”

Source: de zeen



A glimpse to the future – Big changes coming in sports cars

“The (Porsche) sport car just got 70 years old last year … but what you see is in the next seven years there will be more change than in the last 70 ”, said Anja Hendel, director of innovation management and digital transformation at Porsche.



In September this year the company is planning to launch Taycan – its first-ever fully electric vehicle. Earlier this year, Porsche said stronger-than-expected demand has led it to boost production of Taycan, even before its release, from 20,000 to 40,000 units.



The history of the Porsche brand began in 1948, yet the foundation of the sports car manufacturer is built upon the life’s work of Professor Ferdinand Porsche – work which his son Ferry then continued. Ferdinand Porsche had already designed pioneering innovations for the automotive industry as early as the start of the last century. In 1900, he built an electric car with a wheel hub drive known as the Lohner-Porsche, a vehicle on which he would then base the world’s first all-wheel-drive passenger car. In the same year, he created a template for hybrid vehicles with the development of a mixed petrol-electric powertrain.

The Porsche 911 designed by Ferry Porsche’s son, Ferdinand Alexander, finally gave the company its breakthrough as one of the leading manufacturers of sports cars in the world, both from a technical and a design perspective. The Porsche 911, presented to the global public for the first time in 1963, has now been built over a million times.


Source: 
CNBC